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Monk Chants

Recorded on August 20, 1995, at the Rinchenpung Monastery. Symbolically Vajrayogini’s naval, the gompa houses a statue of Rang Rig Gyapo - the king of self-awareness and the wrathful emanation of Padmasambhava. The monk chants are an invocation to this meditation deity to protect all sentient beings from the consequences of their own misguided behavior.

How Did We Get Here?

172a 1994 Gil Troy in Village Hike Out

At this time I would like these Blog Posts to chronicle our 1994, 1995 and 1997’s expeditions by featuring excerpts from the draft book accompanied by corresponding photographs.

It’s interesting to witness the three expeditions weaving – almost seamlessly – in and out of one another in a consistent and ever evolving story-line. It’s truly an ordered A-B-C chronology that ultimately culminates in an unforeseen but climactic conclusion – a conclusion not possible without the prior two odysseys.

1994
At night, gazing up at Tibet’s virgin skies, I would reflect on the thread of interrelated events that had delivered Troy and me to this point in time.

It was a rather linear path, centered around a great interest in the outdoors and my lifelong obsession with understanding the human mind. The outdoors part was easy. Our father loved to hunt and fish. We were exposed to camping and hiking as far back as we could remember.

And my interest in the workings of the mind also had a clear path. As a boy I was fascinated by people’s different perceptions of reality. The idea that – in the arena of the mind, what you believe to be true, is – intrigued me. I found strong evidence of this in both practical jokes and hypnosis. Hypnosis led to the Hindu - Paramahansa Yogananda’s – mind science teachings as a way to visualize and rewire our brains – thus manipulating our realities. I utilized visualization and self-hypnosis as a way to achieve my goals.

My journey of the mind finally settled on Tibetan Buddhism and meditation as a means to a happier life. I loved the pragmatism of Tibetan Buddhism. I loved the outrageous teachings of Tibetan meditation master Chögyam Trungpa.

It was this interest in the mind that led directly to our adventures in Tibet.

I remember clearly, February 1st 1994. I was turning forty in twenty-five days. This was a big one for me. My gift to myself was a promise to go to Tibet. I had no idea how or where in Tibet. I knew nothing about Tibet other than Chögyam Trungpa was from there. So I set my intention.

Trungpa Photo

Meditation is not a matter of trying to achieve ecstasy, spiritual bliss or tranquility, nor is it attempting to be a better person. It is simply the creation of space in which we are able to expose and undo our neurotic games, our self-deception, our hidden fears and hopes.
Chögyam Trungpa

Exactly one week later on the front page of Section C of our Arizona Republic newspaper there was a long article written by Hal Mattern titled, “Crazy about Canyons”. The feature stated:

“Tucson resident Richard D. Fisher is looking for people to join his 21-day expedition in May to Tibet, where a team will explore the Namche Barwa Canyon. Fisher, who has visited the canyon three times already and found it to be the deepest gorge in the world, stresses that the trip will be no walk in the park. ‘We’re talking about a real adventure,’ Fisher says.”

The article was punctuated by a photograph of an enormous, cloud-shrouded and lush green canyon with a colossal river churning through it. I sat there stunned. “This is it. This is perfect. What a coincidence!”, I thought to myself.

There was a phone number. I was going on that trip. I found a pay phone and called Rick. But before I could finish introducing myself he said, “Do you have any rafting experience?”

“Hell yes I have rafting experience.” I told him. “My brother Troy and I rafted 430-miles down the Green River. We’ve rafted the Big Drops in the Colorado River’s Cataract Canyon and we’ve rafted the upper Salt River here in Arizona many times.” I was going to tell him we’d rafted Africa’s Zambezi but I thought that might be pushing it. I told him we’d hiked across the states of Arizona and Washington. Here the conversation took on the needy flavor of a job interview so I shut up.

“That all sounds good,” said Rick. “I’m getting married this weekend so why don’t we get back in touch in a couple of weeks?”

A couple of weeks! No way. I was going on that trip. I told him Troy and I were coming the next day (Tucson is only 120 miles south of Scottsdale) and it wouldn’t take us five minutes to introduce ourselves and give him the required deposit to secure our slots on the expedition. He reluctantly agreed.

Well I knew Troy would be all in. I was excited to tell him. After listening to me babbling for five minutes he looked at me and said, “When do we go?”

 

The bad news is you’re falling through the air, nothing to hang on to, no parachute.
The good news is, there’s no ground.
Chögyam Trungpa

 

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